McKinley starts hybrid learning

Shane Kaneshiro, reporter

McKinley High School’s students and teachers have been transitioning into a hybrid schedule since early in the second quarter.

About half of the students opted to be 100% distance learning, while the other students are on a blended schedule, assigned to come in on either an A, B, C, or D day.

“It went better than I expected,” Principal Ron Okamura said. “You can get over 200 students daily coming to campus, which is manageable.”

During the first week of blended learning, freshman Stacy Cabusas, who is a hundred percent distance learner, said she doesn’t expect the hybrid schedule to change how the students will participate with synchronous learning.

“I feel like it’s going to go the same way it has been for first and second (quarter). Some people are going to show up during classes. Some people don’t listen. Majority probably will listen,” Cabusas said.

Freshman Christian Caoili is coming to school in person and said the system for blended learning is work

ing for him.

“We have more experience in actually going to school, as opposed to sitting behind a screen and that being ‘school,’” Caoili said. “A school year isn’t a school year without going to school IRL.”

Junior Erwin Laroco said he chose hybrid to get a break from being at home.

“The comforts of my home were starting to somewhat cave in on me,” he said. “So by doing hybrid I am able to get a breather away from my home.”

Junior Shane Eng also chose to be hybrid and is enjoying it.

“It feels good to be back on campus,” Eng said.

Teachers and staff have been creating safety measures of six feet social distancing and schedules for the students to follow when they come back. The teachers have also been working to keep their students engaged within their classrooms.

Science teacher Jared Winquist said, “It’s challenging for the teachers to balance the students that are in class and those that are at home, to keep them both engaged.”

As the school community continues to try to learn and be safe, Okamura encourages Tigers to do the right thing.

“If you are feeling sick, if you’re having any type of symptoms, sneezing, runny nose, coughing, fever, aches, no taste, no smell, … don’t come to school,” Okamura said. “As much as (you) want to come to school, don’t come to school.”